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A Message from Whoopi Goldberg: TB a Priority for Kids

Posted 28 July 2012, 02:55 A, by Guest

By Whoopi Goldberg, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador

I have been speaking out on behalf of people living with HIV before we even knew exactly what AIDS was, and I have always had a special concern for children affected by the epidemic. I hope to see a world where every child is born HIV-negative and no child dies from an HIV-related cause.

Recently I have come to realize that we are neglecting a major issue and one that really impacts kids. That issue is tuberculosis – TB for short. It’s the leading cause of death among people living with HIV, even though it’s preventable and curable! To me, this is an outrage and what is more devastating is the impact TB has on children in communities affected by HIV. People living with HIV are much more likely to develop TB than people free of HIV infection. More...

AIDS 2012: In a Watershed Year, Breakthroughs Await

Posted 14 July 2012, 07:23 A, by Guest

By David Wilson*, World Bank's Global AIDS Program Director

When the International AIDS Conference was last held in Washington, D.C. in 1987, Ronald Reagan was U.S. president, the Soviet Union stood, a wall scarred a divided Berlin and China’s economy was roughly the size of Spain’s. The wider world – and the AIDS epidemic – has changed more than anyone foresaw.

The conference returns to Washington in a watershed year. AIDS remains the greatest infectious disease challenge of our age: more than 65 million people infected and 30 million deaths since the epidemic began, and roughly three million new infections and two million deaths a year.  More...

Geneva 2012 on the way to AIDS 2012?

Posted 26 March 2012, 08:47 P, by Guest

By Eric Fleutelot, Deputy CEO, International, Sidaction

From March 25th-28th, Geneva will host the 6th Francophone Conference on HIV-AIDS: www.vihgeneve2012.com

It is estimated, according to the WHO, that 4 million of people live with HIV in francophone countries. Most of them, of course, live in West and Central Africa. The fight against HIV in French-speaking countries is very dynamic, but it’s a fact that the ART coverage rate in those countries are, in average, lower than in other parts of Africa, and there are a lot of disparities, between Rwanda with a coverage rate of 80% and the République Démocratique du Congo with only 12%. More...

Letter to the Editor of the Washington Post

Posted 19 March 2012, 10:09 P, by Elly Katabira, IAS President

In their fascinating excerpt on the origins of the AIDS epidemic [“…And the World Got the AIDS Epidemic,” Feb. 28], Craig Timberg and Daniel Halperin argue that timing played a key role in the initial spread of the virus. They note that without a perfect storm of events between the 1880s and 1920s, HIV may never have made it out of the forests of Cameroon. What those of us who work on the global AIDS response know is that much like then, timing is also key now: decades of innovative research, on-the-ground experience and tenacious advocacy have created many of the treatment and prevention tools we need to turn the tide on HIV. Historically, we are at a pivotal moment, and world leaders now have the opportunity before them to bring the epidemic to its end. More...

Women’s Rights, Women’s Leadership: Essential Ingredients to Turning the Tide on the U.S. HIV Epidemic

Posted 10 March 2012, 06:06 A, by Guest

By Naina Khanna, U.S. Positive Women’s Network Coordinator and WORLD Policy Director and Sonia Rastogi, U.S. Positive Women’s Network/WORLD Advocacy Coordinator

This National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, U.S. Positive Women's Network (PWN)), one of two community partners for AIDS 2012, calls for full integration of HIV care and prevention with sexual and reproductive healthcare and violence prevention and counseling services. To ensure this happens, we demand the meaningful involvement of women living with and affected by HIV in the development of all policies and programs addressing the domestic epidemic.

2012 is a tide-turning year in the global history of HIV. Due to new prevention technologies and groundbreaking studies like HPTN 052, we now have the science to end the epidemic. Science has demonstrated that HIV’s trajectory can be altered by providing appropriate medical care and supportive services to keep people in care. In the U.S., the Affordable Care Act (also known as health care reform) and the U.S. National HIV/AIDS Strategy are policies that have the possibility of implementing science’s innovation. More...